Thai Language Guide (Beginners)

Basic Language Guide

Sawatdee (khrap/kha)

Hello

Sabai Dee Mai? (khrap/kha)

How are you?

Sabai Dee (khrap/kha)

Fine

Khob Khun (khrap/kha)

Thank you

Mai Pen Rai

Never mind (handy all purpose phrase to express the Thai go-with-the-flow attitude)

Yindee Duai

Congratulations

Chai

Yes

Mai Chai

No

Dai

(You/ I) Can

Mai Dai

Cannot

Khun Chue Arai?

What is your name?

Chan/Pom Chue Jane/James

My name is Jane/James

Khaw Tode

Sorry

Chuay

Help

Sai/Kwa

Left/Right

Mai Phed

Not Spicy

Gai/Moo

Chicken/Pork

Koong/Pla

Shrimp/Fish

Nuea Wuaw

Beef

Gin Mai Dai

Cannot eat

Aroi

Tasty

Pood Thai Mai Dai

I can not speak Thai.

Khao Jai Mai

do you understand?

Mai Khao Jai

I do not understand

Nee, Tao Rai?

How much?

Paeng

Expensive

Paeng mak

Very expensive

Lot noi dai mai

Can you give a little discount

Took

Cheap

Naam

Water

Chok dee

Good luck

Chan/Pom Rian Tee Webster

I study at Webster

Ron

Hot

Nao

Cold

Naam khaeng

Ice

Naam Plao

Water Bottle

Nit noi

Not much - a little bit

Yai

Large/Big

Lek

Small

Baan

House

Hong naam

Toilet

Rong Piyabaan

Hospital

Rong Rian

School

Learn Thai Numbers to Bargain like a Boss!

Neung

1

Song

2

Sam

3

Si

4

Haa

5

Hok

6

Jet

7

Paed

8

Gow

9

Sip

10

Sip-et

11

Sip-song

12

Yee sip

20

Saam sip

30

Ha sip ha

55

Roi/loi

100

Song roi ha sip sam

253

Funny Fact:

You may see Thai people using "555" on social media or while texting. In Thai, the number 5 is called "Ha" so people use the numbers instead of the letters!

Telling Time:

While Thais do use the familiar 24 hour military time system to some extent, for example for official announcements, but in every day life a different and uniquely Thai system is used instead. Learn More below:

Telling Time in Thai

The easiest way to approach it is to recognise that the Thai clock is divided up into roughly 4 blocks of 6 hours each rather than 2 of 12, and that each of these blocks of time is referred to in a different way.

For telling time between the hours of 1am and 5am, the number of the hour is preceded by the word ตี dtee . This is also the verb "to strike", and its use here comes from the ancient custom of a night watchman striking a drum on the hour throughout the night to reassure village residents of their safety.


The hours between 1pm and 6pm are referred to using the words บ่าย bàai ("early afternoon") and เย็น yen ("late afternoon/early evening"). 1-3pm are always referred to using bàai, 5-6pm using yen .

4pm is borderline between the two time periods and can be referred to using either of them, though it's more common to use yen.The hours from 7pm to 11pm are referred to using the numbers 1 - 5 followed by the word ทุ่ม tûm.

Midnight is occasionally referred to as หกทุ่ม hòk tûm , but much more common is เที่ยงคืน tîang keun as above.